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Vaccination Schedules

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Vaccination Schedule for Kittens

All kittens need vaccinations to help them stay healthy. Vaccines health protect kittens against certain diseases while their immune system continues to develop. Cat vaccines are divided into two types:

Core vaccines:
Vaccines that protect against widespread and serious diseases and every cat should receive. All kittens should receive a vaccine that protects them against feline panleucopenia, feline herpes and feline calicivirus.

Non-core vaccines:
Vaccines that are recommended only for cats that might be at a particular risk of infection, based on their lifestyle or the region they live in. These include vaccines against feline leukaemia virus, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Chlamydia felis and (in the case of the UK) rabies are non-core.

Primary vaccination schedule:
A typical recommended core vaccination schedule for kittens will start at around 8-9 weeks of age, followed by a booster 3-4 weeks later, finishing from around 12 weeks of age. Another booster needs to then be given one year later. In most cases kittens in the UK spend time outdoors and may therefore encounter and cats that may carry feline leukemia virus. Kittens are therefore usually offered vaccination against FeLV too.

Vaccination Schedule for Adult cats

Regular vaccination throughout a cat’s life is really important to help maintain immunity against common diseases such as cat flu. Cat vaccines are divided into two types:

Core vaccines:
Vaccines that protect against widespread and serious diseases and every cat should receive. All kittens should receive a vaccine that protects them against feline panleucopenia, feline herpes and feline calicivirus.

Non-core vaccines:
Vaccines that are recommended only for cats that might be at a particular risk of infection, based on their lifestyle or the region they live in. These include vaccines against feline leukaemia, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Chlamydia and (in the case of the UK) rabies are non-core.

Booster vaccination schedules:
Assuming your cat has received the proper primary vaccination schedule (see kitten vaccination schedule), then it is recommended that your cat visit a veterinary practice at least once a year for a health assessment and review. After the first annual booster, at which all vaccines will be repeated, the exact vaccine given each year may vary. Typically vaccines are available for both feline panleucopaenia and feline leukaemia which allow revaccination at 3 year intervals, whilst in most cases annual revaccination against the cat flu viruses are still advised by practices.

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Vaccination Schedule for Puppies

One of the key reasons why puppies are vaccinated early in life is so that they can be properly “socialised”, without fear of disease. Socialisation is absolutely vital to ensure a balanced and well-behaved adult dog.

Dog vaccines are divided into two types:

Core vaccines:
Vaccines that protect against common or particularly lethal diseases and every dog should receive. All puppies need to be protected against parvovirus, hepatitis, distemper and (in the UK at least) leptospirosis

Non-core vaccines:
Vaccines that are recommended only for dogs that might be at a particular risk of infection, based on their lifestyle or the region they live in. These include vaccines against kennel cough, rabies, leishmaniosis, and canine herpesvirus. Depending on the dog’s lifestyle and travel plans, they may need to be vaccinated against some of these diseases but speak to your vet as they will be able to give you the best recommendation

Primary vaccination schedules:
Puppies should receive their first combined vaccine to protect against canine parvovirus, distemper, leptospirosis and hepatitis. These vaccines can be administered from as early as 6 weeks but more commonly at around 8 weeks, A second dose is needed 2-4 weeks after. Some practices offer alternative protocols involving 3 doses that can enhance early immunity and help early socialisation

Vaccination Schedule for Adult dogs

Regular vaccination throughout a dog’s life is important – as it ensures that they are free to explore and socialise with other dogs, without fearing becoming infected with a range of important diseases. Dog vaccines are divided into two types:

Core vaccines:
Vaccines that protect against common or particularly lethal diseases and every dog should receive. All puppies need to be protected against parvovirus, hepatitis, distemper and (in the UK at least) leptospirosis

Non-core vaccines:
Vaccines that are recommended only for dogs that might be at a particular risk of infection, based on their lifestyle or the region they live in. These include vaccines against kennel cough, rabies, leishmaniosis, and canine herpesvirus. Depending on the dog’s lifestyle and travel plans, they may need to be vaccinated against some of these diseases but speak to your vet as they will be able to give you the best recommendation

Booster vaccine schedule:
Assuming your dog has received the proper primary vaccination schedule (see puppy vaccination schedule), then after the first annual booster your dog would only needs to receive annual boosters against leptospirosis and Kennel Cough, with booster vaccines every three years against canine parvovirus, infectious hepatitis and distemper.