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Canine Infectious Respiratory Disease (CIRD)

Signs

Harsh dry cough

This may be prove distressing and may lead to retching of froth and mucus. The cough can last several weeks

Loss of appetite

This tends to occur in more serious disease

Fever

Some individuals may become very unwell and develop pneumonia

Harsh dry cough

This may be prove distressing and may lead to retching of froth and mucus. The cough can last several weeks

Density of Reports

The map shows the density of confirmed cases of Kennel Cough for the past three years.

This is not necessarily an indication of what areas the disease is more prevalent in, as the data captured by these labs is likely to be a small proportion of the suspected number of dogs that might be affected by the disease.

This is, however, an indication that this disease is present in the UK and if vaccination rates drop, we are likely to see an increase in the number of dogs being affected by this dangerous disease.

Speak to your vet about how to make sure your dog is protected against Kennel Cough

Report Density
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How is it spread?

Canine infectious tracheobronchitis is transmitted by coughing, sneezing or nose-to-nose contact. The disease can spread rapidly and can last up to six weeks.

Prevention and Control

Vaccination is typically the best way to protect dogs against major causes of kennel cough, especially for dogs kept together in close proximity who are especially at risk. To protect against kennel cough, a vaccine can be given. This vaccine is given via the dog’s nose to maximise protection. Dogs can sometimes sneeze after this vaccine.

If your dog has been affected, isolate them and avoid contact with cats.