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Cat Flu

Signs

Stuffy Nose

Discharge from the nose and eyes, sneezing and sore eyes associated with conjunctivitis are common signs. Feline herpesvirus, in particular can lead to persistent infections which do not fully resolve, which lead to recurrent and painful eye complications.

Depression and Failure to eat

A high fever can lead to significant depression, inability to smell and taste food as well as pain from mouth ulcers or from inflammation of the throat can prevent feeding and drinking and will compound the problem of dehydration

Coughing

Although a less common sign in a cat associated with respiratory infection it is a more common feature where an infection is due to the Bordetellla bacteria. Complicated cases may develop a life-threatening pneumonia

Stuffy Nose

Discharge from the nose and eyes, sneezing and sore eyes associated with conjunctivitis are common signs. Feline herpesvirus, in particular can lead to persistent infections which do not fully resolve, which lead to recurrent and painful eye complications.

Density of Reports

The map shows the density of confirmed cases of cat flu for the past three years.

This is not necessarily an indication of what areas the disease is more prevalent in, as the data captured by these labs is likely to be a small proportion of the suspected number of cats that might be affected by the disease.

This is, however, an indication that this disease is present in the UK and if vaccination rates drop, we are likely to see an increase in the number of cats being affected by this dangerous disease.

Speak to your vet about how to make sure your cat is protected against cat flu

Report Density
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How is it spread?

Infection is spread between infected cats either by close contact such as sneezing or mutual grooming or via contact with objects in the environment which become contaminated by discharges. Many cats that are infected subsequently become “carriers”, able to transmit the disease on to other cats for weeks, months and sometimes permanently.

Prevention and Control

The risk of developing cat 'flu can be significantly reduced by regular vaccination. Both cat flu viruses which are present in core vaccine for cats. In addition, catteries should ensure as far as possible that the opportunities for spread of infection are minimized by ensuring excellent hygiene and biosecurity, good ventilation and housing which minimizes the risk of transmission.